Sometimes #noestimates can’t help you predict the future

Now that #noestimates has become fairly mainstream, you could wonder how #noestimates can help you predict the future? When I saw that InfoQ included #noestimates as part of their “State of Agile” article for 2014 it was clear to me that #noestimates will continue to be part of our common future.

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Two recent posts

I’ve recently posted two pieces of content on other platforms:

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Should you distrust agile?

Why do some people distrust agile software development? Should you distrust agile software development? How can you possible trust people who say that they will “take your money and deliver something” after a month or so? How can you possible trust people who have a rubber bird as part of their continuous integration process? After my recent post on trust in agile software development, Mike Lehr asked me why people distrust agile software development.

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Software Development Success

Software development success is organization dependent. Which organizations are successful in developing and delivering software? Which projects will be successful? That is a crucial question in an industry with an annual turnover of over 400 billion USD and only a 50% success rate. Is it enough to be agile or is there something else needed?

I was thrilled to read “Agile Principles and Achievement of Success in Software Development: A Quantitative Study in Brazilian Organizations” by Paulo Henrique de Souza Bermejo et al. Why is it so exciting? Because the authors use a novel approach to quantitatively and statistically evaluate what software development organizations do and how that is linked to success.
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Agile projects requirements breakdown structure

In Agile projects, when a set of requirements are received from Clients, it may consist of (a mix of) A few needs, objectives, goals and some partial stories (even though it would have come in a structured document). Re-organizing (re-arranging) those into a requirements breakdown structure (RBS) helps ask right questions to client to come out with what they expect to achieve from a Project.

Image above depicts the Fibonacci series, which is used as one of the  sizing techniques for User stories.

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Change is the only constant in agile

How much change can a project withstand before it is too much? A requirements change rate of above 20% is probably too much . Typical rules of thumb figures for software development requirements change rate is cited as 1-3% . But the rate of change is accelerating. In 2002, 10% was not uncommon . How high is it now?
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Can you trust agile software development?

As a consultant and as an agilist I have a vested interest in trust. Trust might be seen as one of the top two factors for success in software development projects . Most of us have a vague idea of what is needed to create trust. Charles H Green of The Trusted Advisor has come up with “the trust equation“. I first learned about the trust equation in one of Joe Dager‘s excellent podcasts. Continue reading Can you trust agile software development?

Software Effort Estimation Problems

Software effort estimation is an important part of the daily lives of many software professionals. I have joined the #noestimates debate on Twitter because there is a lot to learn from a discussion on estimates. I’m not ready to fully abandon estimates but I am interested in discussing where, when and how to apply them — or not… Continue reading Software Effort Estimation Problems

Blogging on “Capping IT Off”

I’ve started blogging at the Capping IT Off blog. Posts there will be about topics that are off topic for this blog. My first post is about e-health innovation and apps. My conclusion? E-health will be powered by thin, targeted applications built on a stable framework.

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    Agile Community of Practice

    I’m a strong believer in learning by doing. I also believe that learning will be better when supported by an agile community of practice (CoP). Communities of practice allow self-selected members to develop their “capabilities, build and exchange knowledge”. In my professional life, I am involved in several communities including larger associations such as IEEE and ACM but also more focused communities at work including on Enterprise Architecture, E-health and Agile.

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